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Article

Mariana Isabel Lorenzetti

and the first minister of public health of the nation during the government of Juan Domingo Perón, between the years 1946 and 1954, was born on 7 March 1906 in the province of Santiago del Estero. The oldest of eleven siblings, he was the son of Ramón Carrillo, a professor, journalist, and politician (elected as a provincial representative on three occasions), and María Salomé Gómez.

Federico Pérgola (2009) writes that Carrillo attended elementary and high school in his native city, Santiago del Estero, and, according to one of his siblings, Arturo Carrillo (2005) he was an exceptional student from a very early age He took his fifth and sixth grade examinations early and was able to enroll at the age of 12 in the National College of Santiago del Estero He graduated from the institution with a bachelor s degree as well as a ...

Article

Richard Watts

Born into a lower-middle class Haitian family in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, François Duvalier attended local primary schools and, later, the Lycée Pétion, where he was taught by his political mentor, Dumarsais Estimé. Duvalier subsequently attended medical school at the national university, earning a degree in 1934. He then turned to civil service, working for the Haitian government for the next ten years. During this time Duvalier became part of a collective known as the Griots, a group of intellectuals, inspired by the Négritude movement, who sought to glorify Haiti's African heritage.

In Le problème des classes à travers l'histoire d'Haïti (1946), Duvalier and Lorimer Denis rejected a Marxist analysis of class and claimed that the historical supremacy of the mulatto (of African and European descent) elite in Haiti was an ethnic rather than an economic phenomenon Many historians deem this work a vulgarization of the ...