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Marva Griffin Carter

concert pianist, arts administrator, and musicologist, was born in Atlanta, Georgia, into a family of distinguished educators, musicians, and writers. Her maternal grandfather, William Jefferson White, was the founder of historic Morehouse College. Her poet mother, Claudia Turner (White) Harreld, was one of the first graduates of Spelman College in 1901, where she also taught. Her father, Kemper Harreld, was a renowned violinist. He served for forty-five years as the first director of music of the glee club and of the orchestra at Morehouse College, and for nearly thirty years directed Spelman College's music program. He began teaching his daughter violin when she was three, and he later introduced her to the piano.

Josephine Harreld s concert career as a pianist began when she was twelve and continued intermittently for the next thirty seven years She received an impressive education taking a BA ...

Article

Amber Karlins

was born in Norfolk, Virginia, to Reverend John J. Mainor and Alice Jeffries Mainor. Her sister was a piano player, and Dorothy grew up in a house full of music and sang regularly at her father’s church. However, despite her passion for music, she did not initially envision it as a possible career path.

At fourteen Dorothy began studying at the Hampton Institute with the intention of pursuing a career as a teacher. In 1929 she had the opportunity to tour with the school’s choir, and the director was so impressed by her potential that he called Dorothy’s father and insisted her major be changed to music. Although Dorothy was not consulted at all, she was nevertheless pleased by the change.

Soon after Dorothy was granted a scholarship to Westminster Choir College, where she studied choral conducting before graduating in 1935 She then moved to New York under the ...

Article

Jeremy Rich

was born in the town of Bolobo in the Bandundu province of what is now the Democratic Republic of Congo. He lost his father at a very young age, and his mother was illiterate and never obtained a birth certificate. Ngombe’s mother struggled to support her son. In 1934 he persuaded a woman to bring him to the Congolese capital of Leopoldville, where his older sister lived. Ngombe scrambled to make a living in the big city, since his sister barely managed to get by and depended on friends for lodging. After not finding steady work for a year, he enrolled at the Saint Joseph Catholic mission primary school in 1935. Ngombe only completed five years of education there, and then quit to support himself in 1940 Father Raphael de la Kethulle one of the most prominent social activists in the Congo in the 1940s persuaded Ngombe to ...