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Jeremy Rich

was born in the town of Bolobo in the Bandundu province of what is now the Democratic Republic of Congo. He lost his father at a very young age, and his mother was illiterate and never obtained a birth certificate. Ngombe’s mother struggled to support her son. In 1934 he persuaded a woman to bring him to the Congolese capital of Leopoldville, where his older sister lived. Ngombe scrambled to make a living in the big city, since his sister barely managed to get by and depended on friends for lodging. After not finding steady work for a year, he enrolled at the Saint Joseph Catholic mission primary school in 1935. Ngombe only completed five years of education there, and then quit to support himself in 1940 Father Raphael de la Kethulle one of the most prominent social activists in the Congo in the 1940s persuaded Ngombe to ...

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Paul Von Blum

artist and arts administrator, was born in Greenville, North Carolina, the son of John Ivery Outterbridge, a self-employed truck hauler, and Olivia Outterbridge, a homemaker whom her son imaginatively describes as a “poet of family life.” John Outterbridge's decades of artistic accomplishments, including paintings, sculptures, and mixed media assemblages, influenced and inspired younger artists of all backgrounds throughout southern California and the nation. His artwork, reflecting his profound dedication to recapturing the African and African American past, made him a legendary figure in African American art. Throughout his career, moreover, he combined administrative leadership in Los Angeles–area community art programs with a prolific record of studio production.

Each step of his life informed his artistic perspective Discovering his creativity in early childhood he drew and painted with his parents active encouragement He experienced both the slights and insults of the Jim Crow era as well as the ...

Article

Cynthia Hawkins

painter and cofounder of New York City's Kenkeleba House, was born in Conehatta, Mississippi, to Cleo Huddleston, an entrepreneur and author, and Joe Overstreet, a mason. He was the second of three children. His oldest sibling, La Verda O. Allen, owned a construction management firm, and the youngest, Harry, was an architect. Between 1941 and 1946 the Overstreet family moved five times before finally settling in Berkeley, California. Joe graduated from Oakland Technical High School in 1951 and then joined the merchant marine and worked part-time in this capacity from 1951 through 1958. At the same time he also worked as an animator at the Walt Disney Studios.

Overstreet began his art studies in 1951 at Contra Costa College. He established a studio on Grant Avenue in San Francisco, near Sargent Claude Johnson's studio. Mentored by the artists Johnson and Raymond Howell Overstreet ...

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Michael Collins

Alfred B. Spellman has cut a wide swath in the world of the arts as a music critic, poet, administrator, and educator. “It's a function of social consciousness,” he said in a 1992 interview (Dance/USA Journal, Winter 1992), “to provide art, strong art.” The creation, identification, and support of “strong art” have been the alternating currents of Spellman's career, whose highlights include the publication of his book of poems, The Beautiful Days, in 1965, the appearance of his classic Black Music: Four Lives (as Four Lives in the BeBop Business) in 1966, and his two decades of service at the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA).

One of two sons of the schoolteachers Alfred and Rosa Bailey Spellman, Alfred B. Spellman was born 12 August 1935 in his grandmother s house in Nixonton a hamlet outside Elizabeth City North Carolina Perhaps ...