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Richard A. Long

Margaret Burroughs was born in St. Rose, Louisiana, near New Orleans, but was brought at the age of five by her parents, Alexander and Octavia Pierre Taylor, to Chicago where she grew up, was educated, and where her distinctive career has unfolded. She attended the public schools of Chicago, including the Chicago Teacher's College. In 1946, she received a BA in education and in 1948, an MA in education from the Art Institute of Chicago. From 1940 to 1968 she was a teacher in the Chicago public schools and subsequently a professor of humanities at Kennedy-King College in Chicago (1969–1979).

Burroughs has a national reputation as a visual artist and as an arts organizer. Her long exhibition record as a painter and printmaker began in 1949 and included exhibitions throughout the United States and abroad A retrospective of her work was held in Chicago ...

Article

Marva Griffin Carter

concert pianist, arts administrator, and musicologist, was born in Atlanta, Georgia, into a family of distinguished educators, musicians, and writers. Her maternal grandfather, William Jefferson White, was the founder of historic Morehouse College. Her poet mother, Claudia Turner (White) Harreld, was one of the first graduates of Spelman College in 1901, where she also taught. Her father, Kemper Harreld, was a renowned violinist. He served for forty-five years as the first director of music of the glee club and of the orchestra at Morehouse College, and for nearly thirty years directed Spelman College's music program. He began teaching his daughter violin when she was three, and he later introduced her to the piano.

Josephine Harreld s concert career as a pianist began when she was twelve and continued intermittently for the next thirty seven years She received an impressive education taking a BA ...

Article

Amber Karlins

was born in Norfolk, Virginia, to Reverend John J. Mainor and Alice Jeffries Mainor. Her sister was a piano player, and Dorothy grew up in a house full of music and sang regularly at her father’s church. However, despite her passion for music, she did not initially envision it as a possible career path.

At fourteen Dorothy began studying at the Hampton Institute with the intention of pursuing a career as a teacher. In 1929 she had the opportunity to tour with the school’s choir, and the director was so impressed by her potential that he called Dorothy’s father and insisted her major be changed to music. Although Dorothy was not consulted at all, she was nevertheless pleased by the change.

Soon after Dorothy was granted a scholarship to Westminster Choir College, where she studied choral conducting before graduating in 1935 She then moved to New York under the ...