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Glenn Allen Knoblock

World War II coastguardsman and medal winner, was born and raised in New York, possibly in the borough of Manhattan. Nothing is known of David's early life.

While it is uncertain whether Charles David Jr. joined the coast guard prior to the war, or after the attack on Pearl Harbor, his rating at the time of his death suggests that he voluntarily enlisted late in 1941 or early 1942. By late 1942 David had joined the crew of the coast guard cutter Comanche a 165 foot long vessel that carried a crew of about six officers and sixty enlisted men As an African American David was assigned the only rating that blacks were allowed to hold at the time that of steward s mate with promotion available to steward It was the job of the stewards and stewards mates to serve the ship s officers help to prepare ...

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Glenn Allen Knoblock

World War II coastguardsman and medal award winner, is a man about whom little personal information is known. A native of Attalla, Alabama, he entered the coast guard at Baltimore, Maryland, on 12 July 1941. Like all African Americans who joined the coast guard at this time DeYampert was assigned the rating of mess attendant (a designation changed during the early war years to steward's mate and steward), which meant that his job was to serve a ship's officers their meals and to take care of their quarters and other personal chores. Demeaning as such work might be, the steward's rating was at the time DeYampert's only available option. By the end of World War II things would change, but only to a small degree; of the just over five thousand African Americans who served in the coast guard during the war years, 63 percent served as stewards.

DeYampert ...

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James M. O'Toole

Coast Guard officer and Alaska pioneer, was born Michael Augustine Healy in Jones County, Georgia, to Michael Morris Healy, an immigrant from Ireland, and Eliza Clark, a mixed-race slave owned by Michael Morris Healy. Michael was the sixth of nine surviving children born to his parents, who, though never legally married, maintained a common-law relationship for more than twenty years, neither one of them ever marrying anyone else. Michael Morris Healy was barred by Georgia law from emancipating either his wife or his children, but he treated them as family members rather than as slaves, even as he owned fifty other slaves. He was a successful cotton planter and amassed the resources to send his children north before the Civil War, which he did as each approached school age, beginning in 1844 The children exhibited a wide range of complexion but most of them including young ...

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John M. Carroll

football player and coach, was born in Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania, the son of Elzie Tunnell and Catherine Adams. Raised by his mother, a housekeeper, he was a star athlete in basketball and football at Radnor (Pennsylvania) High School. Upon graduating from high school in 1942, he attended the University of Toledo. In 1943 Tunnell played on the Toledo basketball team that advanced to the finals of the National Invitation Tournament in New York City before losing to St. John's University. During his single varsity football season at Toledo, Tunnell suffered a broken neck. After a period of recovery he joined the U.S. Coast Guard in 1944. In 1946 following his release from the service he enrolled at the University of Iowa Playing in both offensive and defensive backfields Tunnell had a successful season with the Hawkeyes but was forced to sit out his senior year ...