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date: 04 June 2020

Harrison, Benjamin locked

(b. 20 August 1833; d. 13 March 1901), Civil War general and twenty-third president of the United States.
  • Thomas Adams Upchurch

Extract

Born on the southern Ohio frontier near Cincinnati, Benjamin Harrison came from one of the most respected families in American political history. His great-grandfather signed the Declaration of Independence and served as governor of Virginia, his grandfather was the nation's ninth president, and his father represented Ohio in Congress. After graduating in 1852 from Miami University in Oxford, Ohio, Harrison studied law in Cincinnati and then moved to Indianapolis, where he set up a legal practice and made his permanent home. When the Civil War erupted, Harrison received a commission as a lieutenant, quickly progressing to the rank of brigadier general. He campaigned on behalf of Abraham Lincoln in 1864, ran unsuccessfully for governor of Indiana in 1876, and served in the U.S. Senate from 1881 until 1887. In 1888 he accepted the Republican nomination for president.

Although not an abolitionist per se throughout his life ...

A version of this article originally appeared in The Encyclopedia of African American History, 1619–1895.

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