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date: 04 April 2020

Hall, Prince locked

(b. 1735?; d. 4 December 1807), soldier, pamphleteer, educator, merchant-craftsman, and founding member of the African Masonic Lodge No. 459.
  • Richard S. Newman

Extract

Born on the island of Barbados, Prince Hall forged his reputation in the burgeoning free black community of Boston during the 1770s, 1780s, and 1790s. His birth and early life have been the subjects of much debate. He was reputedly born free in 1748, but Hall's birth may have occurred as early as 1735. He was a child of mixed-race parents: his father was English, and his mother was a free woman of color. Hall journeyed to Boston in 1765 and worked in the leather trade.

Like his birth date, Hall's status in colonial Boston has aroused scholarly debate. Although he was technically the slave of the Bostonian William Hall Prince Hall was said to have believed that he was free as his manumission papers noted In any event Hall secured his liberty and began working as a leather merchant He supplied leather goods to the ...

A version of this article originally appeared in The Encyclopedia of African American History, 1619–1895.

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