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date: 04 April 2020

Burke, Selma Hortense locked

(b. 31 December 1900; d. 29 August 1995), artist.
  • Tritobia Hayes Benjamin

Extract

One of the chores assigned to the Burke children every Saturday was to whitewash the fireplaces with a wash made of local clay. Selma Hortense Burke discovered right away that this clay could be molded into delightful shapes. Her varied career as a teacher, arts administrator, model, and nurse was one of distinction and achievement, but it is her work as a sculptor that is the most memorable. Working with a variety of woods, marbles, and stones, Burke infused her figures with expressiveness, heroism, and power. She focused on the human figure, from the earliest clay figurines she created as a young artist to a statue she completed in the late 1970s of Martin Luther King Jr.

A version of this article originally appeared in Black Women in America, 2nd ed.

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