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date: 15 July 2020

Theiler, Max locked

1899–1972 South African virologist and Nobel Prize winner who made major contributions to research on the viral disease known as yellow fever.
  • Barbara Worley

Extract

During the 1930s Max Theiler developed vaccines that protected millions of people from the incurable tropical affliction known as yellow fever. For his contributions, he was awarded the 1951 Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine. Born in Pretoria, Theiler studied medicine at the University of Cape Town, leaving for England in 1919 for Saint Thomas’s Hospital Medical School, London, where he completed his medical training in 1922. That year, he moved to the United States, joining the Department of Tropical Medicine at the Harvard Medical School. In 1930 he accepted a post with the Rockefeller Foundation in New York City. He remained with the foundation until 1964 when he became professor of epidemiology at Yale University New Haven Connecticut At Harvard Theiler s early research interest was in amebic dysentery but he soon switched his efforts to yellow fever An important finding during the 1920s was that ...

A version of this article originally appeared in Africana: The Encyclopedia of the African and African American Experience.

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