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date: 09 April 2020

Rice, Condoleezza locked

1954First female national security advisor in the United States government
  • Rebecca Stefoff

Extract

In January of 2001, soon after President George W. Bush took office, he named Condoleezza Rice as his national security advisor. In this role, Rice has had significant influence in shaping the Bush administration's policies toward other international affairs. Her appointment followed several decades of study, research, and activity in the field of foreign policy, with special focus on Russia (the former Soviet Union) and Europe.

Condoleezza Rice was born in 1954 in Birmingham, Alabama. Her father was a college administrator. Her mother was a music teacher who chose her daughter's name—a musical term that means “play with sweetness”—and Condoleezza displayed her own musical talent by becoming a skilled pianist at an early age. She grew up during a difficult era for blacks in the American South. The Civil Rights Movement had not yet eliminated Segregation in the United States and Birmingham experienced some of the worst ...

A version of this article originally appeared in Africana: The Encyclopedia of the African and African American Experience.

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